Software Engineering

Research Staff

  • Professor Kenichi MATSUMOTO

    Professor
    Kenichi MATSUMOTO

  • Associate Professor Takashi Ishio

    Associate Professor
    Takashi ISHIO

  • Affiliate Associate Professor
												Hideaki Hata

    Affiliate Associate Professor
    Hideaki HATA

  • Assistant Professor Raula G. Kula

    Assistant Professor
    Raula G. KULA

  • Assistant Professor Kazumasa SHIMARI

    Assistant Professor
    Kazumasa SHIMARI

  • Assistant Professor Bodin Chintanet

    Assistant Professor
    Bodin CHINTHANET

Research Areas

Fig.1 AI-supported distance learning system: Chameleon

Fig.1 AI-supported distance learning system: Chameleon

Fig.2 Activity analysis on the NAIST one-way carsharing with a heat map

Fig.2 Activity analysis on the NAIST one-way carsharing with a heat map

Fig.3 Social analysis on dependency networks for software ecosystems

Fig.3 Social analysis on dependency networks for software ecosystems

Software data mining

  • Software quality analysis and cost estimation
  • Visualization and substantiation for software analytics
  • Natural language processing in software development
  • Data-driven software development

Free/libre and open source software engineering

  • Expert recommendation models in open source development
  • Communication analysis in open source development
  • Toward understanding open source ecosystems for user support
  • Software repository mining and integration in open source system

Human factors in software development

  • Measuring human brain activities to assess the program understanding processes
  • Social analysis and game theoretical modeling
  • Eye-tracking-based expertise analysis of online judging
  • TaskPit: A software development task measurement system

Software protection

  • Software obfuscation
  • Software watermarking and birthmarking
  • Software tamper-proofing
  • Blockchain-based tracking systems

Key Features

The software engineering laboratory uses both theoretical and empirical approaches to address various problems related to software development, human computer interaction and software lifecycle management. We fully exploit the potential of students' curiosity and creative thinking and, together with conventional research theories and technologies, explore new topics in software engineering.

While actual software development often relies on project managers' intuition instead of sufficient evidence, our goal is to develop an empirically-guided software development environment where the software development process and product data are measured and decisions are based on the data. We also address current hot topics in software engineering such as open source software engineering, global software development and software protection.